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The Steuben Courier Advocate
  • Isaman quits Steuben County job

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  • HORNELL | Ken Isaman had a choice: Keep his part-time job as an elected official and deal with two people who not only disagree with his moves, but filed a lawsuit against him. Or he could fight the lawsuit and keep his job as Hornell town supervisor and his full-time job as Steuben County Risk manager.
    Isaman left $57,000 on the table Tuesday and walked away from Steuben County.
    With his resignation, he went from making $83,000 a year to $13,000.
    "The full-time job (at Steuben County) had been growing very complicated, we have a very small team, me and the secretary," Isaman explained. "More and more was thrown on us by the state. Even though it was more money, it's less stress. And certainly, we had the two guys suing the town, me individually, and the county."
    A lawsuit was filed by North Hornell Village Trustee Frank Libordi and Larry "Hot Dog" Stephens asking for Isaman to resign from one of the two posts because of what they say is a conflict of interest.
    In the lawsuit, the two cited a 1999 opinion that a risk manager and a town supervisor in Sullivan County had a potential conflict of interest.
    When asked if the county asked him to step down, Isaman said, "No, not really ... It was my decision to make. This was the time, don’t screw around, get it done. Bang."
    Isaman is not shying away from his critics.
    "We have 4,000 people I represent and they have re-elected me every year since 1996 and I cannot let them down," said Isaman. "I want to see the town grow: I want to see new lighting on the four lane; I want to see the flood regulations gone in the Kmart plaza. We have a great town, we are in a great location and we have the ability to accommodate business growth."
    What would have happened if Isaman fought the lawsuit?
    "Our attorney, Joe Pelych, was very confident they would not have won," Isaman added.
    He also said he was glad the neither the town nor county’s time is being used to fight a lawsuit.

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