If you don’t know that the House of Representatives is very close to pushing a health care bill through its chambers this Sunday, then good health is probably not on your radar.

If you don’t know that the House of Representatives is very close to pushing a health care bill through its chambers this Sunday, then good health is probably not on your radar.

Feel free to buy a dozen jelly doughnuts, a couple quarts of chocolate milk and throw yourself a party.

Or maybe you prefer Tea Party tea with your guilty snacks.

The legislation coming up is possibly the single most complicated, nitpicked and fought over package of laws the nation has ever seen.

President Obama on Thursday canceled a trip to Asia because the stakes are so high and the potential margin of victory so small in Sunday’s vote.

What’s all the fuss about?

Well, first, the house bill will restructure about 1/6 of the U.S. economy, our bloated health care industry. We’re going to add about 32 million people who do not have insurance to the ranks of the insured, a major societal achievement and shift in the way America treats people who need medical care.

Our current medical modus operanda cares for these people by sending them to emergency rooms and billing them for services no one expects them to pay for.

Letting the needy have medical access in this manner is humane, but not good economics.

Passage of the bill is expected to bring greater accountability to the insurance industry and Big Pharma.

Proponents of the bill say it could save the U.S. $138 billion over the next 10 years, then cut the deficit by $1.2 trillion in another decade after passage.

I won’t be betting any doughnuts on numbers that big, but it is reasonable to expect the nation to save a great deal of money. Maybe even get us back on the track to balancing the budget.

The bill has some features most people would agree on, for instance no denying of insurance for children with pre-existing medical conditions.

It certainly has features that reasonable people will find unnecessary, perhaps even unreasonable. It’s legislation, sausage as they say. No bill adopted by lawmakers is going to be perfect.

But isn’t it interesting that most of the fuss over the health care issue has been about money, not health?

Big Pharma will lose money, doctors will loose money, supposedly patient prices will rise, depending on which side you listen to.

Not matter what happens, some big spenders are going to lose money on this bill.

If I were a betting man, I’d keep my doughnuts and throw a few chips on the table this Sunday, expecting a historic health care bill to pass the House.

Weekly Citizen

The opinions expressed in this column are not necessarily those of the newspaper.