Michael Brennan, of Avoca, thinks there’s a better way to drop off some documents at the various Steuben County agencies.

Michael Brennan, of Avoca, thinks there’s a better way to drop off some documents at the various Steuben County agencies.
Brennan said it’s difficult sometimes to get paperwork, such as 4-H entries to the county fair or Department of Motor Vehicle documents, into the right hands at the right time.
“Once in a while those offices can get pretty congested,” the Avoca Central School senior said. “And, I don’t know, this (idea) just kind of popped into my head.”
Brennan framed the idea of drop boxes into a legislative resolution for his Youth In Government simulated session last December.
The resolution to install drop boxes throughout the County Office Building was passed unanimously by the rest of the Youth In Government students – and is now being considered by the county Legislature’s Administration Committee.
Legislator Carol Ferratella, R-Corning Town, told the committee last week Brennan’s idea of putting “unofficial” drop boxes in the main office building would be a convenience for residents.
The boxes could not be used for legal, official documents that may need to be officially logged or dated, county Administrator Mark Alger said.
Brennan said he was glad his idea had support, adding the Youth In Government program was a great experience for high school students.
“You get involved,” he said. “You understand why things work the way they do.”
The twice-yearly high school program has been offered to high school juniors and seniors by the county for 25 years. Students spend a semester meeting with legislators and department heads to learn more about Steuben’s operations.
The students then draw up resolutions and meet in a mock legislative session to complete the course.
The students’ ideas do occasionally result in action by county officials, program Coordinator Dick McCandless said.
“I think it’s great they’re going to look at (the drop boxes),” McCandless said. “I think it’s also a compliment to the legislators who take the time to come to the meetings and take these kids seriously.”
Brennan said he is now looking at a couple of colleges and also considering a military career. He’ll turn 18 in April and will “absolutely” register to vote.
But as far as parlaying his Youth in Government class into running for office some time in the future, Brennan turned into a consummate politician.
“I’m not thinking about that at this time,” he said.